Plants and Minerals

Table of Contents

A B C D E
F G H I J
K L M N O
P Q R S T
U V W X Y
Z


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A



Name: Adder’s Tongue
Alternate Names: Adderwort, Dragonwort, Sweet Dock
Found: Temperate plains
Description: Adder’s tongue is a tough perennially growing plant, which has thin stems that grow up to a height of 30 inches. All stems of the herb are crowned with an intense cylindrical bunch of minute white or pink color bloom that appears during the period between May and August. Long bluish-green hued leaves appear lower downwards the stem. The leaves resemble the shape of a forked lance (or snake’s tongue) and higher up the stem the leaves are usually smaller in size. Color of the root varies from deep brown to black. The roots are often bulky, knotted and bent to form an S or double S shape.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d6 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of root
Uses

  • Stopping Bleeding: Powdered adder’s tongue will help to stop bleeding. Craft (alchemy) DC16 check to prepare the powder; powder gives a +10 alchemical bonus to Heal to remove the bleed condition


Name: Agrimony
Alternate Names: Church Steeples, Cocklebur, Liverwort
Found: Temperate forest
Description: Agrimony has spikes that bear rows of tiny yellow flowers-known as church steeples. The agrimony is also characterized by having fruits that are marked by hooked bristles – cockleburs – at the top or towards the tips.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC15 to collect 1d2 uses of flowers
Notes: Agrimony is typically used by herbalist as a sleep inducing remedy, even though the plant itself possess no known narcotic properties. It is believed that when the agrimony is placed under a person’s head, it will induce a deep sleep in the person and the sleep will last as long as the herb is kept near the person.
Uses

  • Spell Component: Agrimony can aid in the casting of spells inducing sleep or drowsiness. Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) agrimony flowers can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Enchantment spells that directly induce sleep, fatigue, exhaustion, or unconsciousness. A Craft (alchemy) DC27 will preserve the agrimony for up to 3d4 months.


Name: Aloe
Found: Tropical and temperate deserts and (dry) plains
Description: Aloe is a stemless cactus-like plant that grows up to to 3 feet tall, and spreads by offsets and root sprouts. The leaves are thick and fleshy, green to grey-green in color, with a serrated edge.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d6 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Burn Salve: The thick leaves of the plant contain a clear jelly-like substance that can be used to heal burns. If this jelly is applied within one round of taking fire or heat damage it will restore one-half of the hit points lost as healing. Fresh Aloe jelly only lasts 1 day before it loses all potency; a Craft (alchemy) DC30 will preserve the jelly as an ointment for up to 30+1d6 days.


Name: Angelica
Alternate Names: Angelsprig, Wild Parsnip
Found: Temperate hills and mountains
Description: This plant grows between 3.3 ft and 8.25 ft high and may bloom twice in the same year. Its tall stem is a purplish-green, hollow and divided. Its leaves are somewhat triangular and attached to the stem by way of a long leaf stalk. The flowers are clustered in a whitish spread of equal length stalks. They give off a sweet, musky scent. The pale yellow fruit contains oval-shaped seeds. The fleshy taproot is brown on the outside, whitish on the inside, and has small branches.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d3 uses of leaves
Notes: The herb is believed to protect against poison, plague and disease, ward off evil spirits and enchantments, bestow long life, and even neutralize the bites of mad dogs.
Uses

  • Spell Component: Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) angelica leaves can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Good descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC28 will preserve the angelica for up to 2d6 months.
  • Defense Against Disease: One can try to use angelica as a proof against disease by keeping a satchel of angelica on ones person. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 check will prepare a satchel of angelica. While worn as a necklace (taking up the neck slot) it provides a +10 alchemical bonus to initial Fortitude saves to resist contracting a disease. The satchel is effective for one week.


Name: Anise
Alternate Names: Aniseed, Sweet Cumin, Wizard’s Friend
Found: Tropical and temperate hills and plains
Description: Anise grows to height of about two feet, and is distinguished by its unusual leaf formation. At its base, the leaves are heart shaped and toothed, but as we progress up the stalk they are small and feathery. It has delicate white flowers which ripen in summer to produce small ridged seeds.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC25, 1d2 uses of seeds
Notes: The anise is believed to increase the production of breast milk in nursing mothers and at the same time, it serves as a natural antacid. It’s most common use, however, is to improve a spellcaster’s ability to prepare spells.
Uses

  • Wizard’s Friend: When taken regularly, anise improves the efficiency with which arcane spellcasters can prepare spells. Using anise in this manner can be addictive; chronic users of Wizard’s Friend are often absentminded and unperceptive. After consuming a specially prepared anise tea any spellcaster that prepares arcane spells may prepare one additional first level spell. If the tea is not consumed over a given a 24 hour period the extra spell slot is lost, along with the spell it contained. Preparing the tea itself requires a Craft (alchemy) DC35 check; actually brewing the tea, however, can be done by anyone. Side Effect: 1d3-1 points of Wisdom damage per dose. Potential for Moderate addiction Fort DC20


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B



Name: Basil
Alternate Names: Arjaka, Luole, Sweet Basil
Found: Temperate hills and plains
Description: Basil possesses thin branching root which grow out into bushy stems that can reach 1-2 feet in height when fully grown, the stem of the plant bears many leaves which have a characteristic purple hue or coloration, and the flowers are peculiar in having two lips. Floral colors can vary from in fully white to fully red – at times a slight purple tinge can be detected in the flowers.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC10 for 2d6 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of flowers
Uses

  • Cooking: Basil leaves are added to food as a flavor enhancer. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve basil leaves indefinitely for cooking.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed basil leaves are often burned in pipes. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve basil indefinitely for smoking.
  • Insect Repellent: Basil flowers can be used to prepare a topical cream that will repel insects. Fresh basil flowers crushed onto the skin has a 25% chance of repelling normal insects. A more concentrated ointment can be prepared with a Craft (alchemy) DC20 check; giant insects must make a Fort save vs. DC15 or refuse to approach a person treated with the ointment closer than 30’. They are not, however, prone to retreat if the person approaches them. One application of the ointment lasts one hour or until washed off.


Name: Bayberry
Alternate Names: Candle Berry, Tallow Shrub, Wax Myrtle
Found: Temperate forests and hills
Description: This plant bears simple, slender leaves that vary from 1 inch to 5 inches in length and are approximately 0.5 inch in width. The color of the plant varies from grayish-green to yellowish-green and exudes an aroma when crushed. The wax myrtle produces numerous trunks that may each grow up to a height of 25 feet and will eventually form a colony, provided they are not gotten rid of. Bayberry produces flowers during the later part of winter. While the male flowers are yellowish-green catkins that grow to a maximum length of 1 inch, the female flowers are comparatively smaller and not easily seen, as they are similar to small swellings which develop into tiny berries, each measuring one-eighth of an inch across and are closely held to the stem.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC15 for 2d4 uses of root
Uses

  • Stimulant: When consumed bayberry has energizing effects, but can upset the stomach. Repeated or chronic use intensifies this effect. A Craft (alchemy) DC20 check can focus this energizing effect into a tonic. When drunk, this tonic will remove fatigue. Someone who is exhausted will become fatigued instead. Side Effect: Make a DC12 Fort save upon consumption of the tonic: success indicates that the character is sickened for 1d4 rounds; failure means the character becomes nauseated for 1d4 rounds, then sickened until he or she has had 8 hours of rest. Each additional dose consumed within 24 hours increases the DC by 5.


Name: Belladonna
Alternate Names: Deadly Nightshade, Dwayberry, Naughty Cherries
Found: Temperate forest and hills
Description: The plant commonly known as the belladonna is a medium sized shrub. It can grow from two to six feet in height; it normally bears two or three branches and has a distinct purplish colored stem. The belladonna bears dark green leaves and each individual leaf is about three to ten inches in length from base to tip. The belladonna also gives off distinct bell shaped flowers which are dark purple in color. The belladonna gives out a strong odor when it is crushed or bruised. The belladonna is an extremely poisonous plant and all parts of the plant contain this poison. The belladonna produces green berries that change to a shiny purplish black color as they ripen. The berries are about the size of the common cherry, however, all are not agreed on the taste of the berries – some say the berry tastes sweet while others say that it tastes bitter. Many people at the same time say that the entire plant possesses a very nauseating odor and they cannot stand the smell.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of root
Notes: Inexperienced herbalists sometimes mistake these plants for nightshade and vice versa, especially since they are effectively prepared the same way.
Uses

  • Cure for Lycanthropy: Fresh belladonna (leaves only, less than 1 week old) can be used as a cure for lycanthropy (granting an additional save), if eaten within 1 hour of the attack. Also poisons the character (see below, -1 to save DC for fresh leaves).
  • Poison: Belladonna relaxes and weakens a character’s muscles. Usually dried and powdered. Craft (alchemy) DC14 to create Ingested Poison (Powder, Fort DC14); 10min onset, 1 save/min for 6 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Effect: 1d2 STR damage


Name: Blackberry
Alternate Names: Brambles
Found: Temperate and cold forest and hills
Description: The plant known as the blackberry is a well known shrub; it is a sprawling, woody and dense plant with stems that are prickled. The blackberry has tenacious, trailing stems reaching up to 15ft in length, when any of these stems comes in contact with the ground, it gives off roots and the plant increases the area it occupies in this way. Blackberry bears dark green colored leaves; the leaves are grouped in clusters of three or five leaves each. Fine hairs can be seen over each leaf and the edges of the each leaf are serrated or toothed. Blackberry bears white or pale pink colored flowers and these come out in mid summer or in mid autumn, the bloom of these flowers is immediately followed by the well-known fleshy berries that ripened to a black color. The same plant may bear both flowers and fruits at the same time.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d3 uses of fruit, 3d4 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Food: The actual berries are edible. 1 use of blackberries corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Blackberries can be preserved for up to a year with a DC10 Craft (alchemy) check
  • Drink: Blackberry leaves can be brewed for tea. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve blackberry leaves for tea indefinitely; actually brewing the tea, however, can be done by anyone.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed blackberry leaves can be burned in pipes. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve blackberry leaves indefinitely for smoking.


Name: Bogbean
Alternate Names: Bitter worm, Bog Hop, Water Shamrock
Found: Temperate and cold swamps and marshes
Description: The ‘bean’ in the plant’s name denotes the even-edged glossy leaves which have some resemblance to the appearance of the young broad beans. Each leaf of the herb is split into three leaflets. Characteristically, the leaves as well as the flowers of bogbean appear above the water level. The flower stalk of bogbean is smooth and may grow up to a height of 30 cm and each flower stalk bears several subtle, fluffy flowers that have resemblance to stars having a pinkish colour on the external side of the petals. When the bogbean flowers are in the phase of buds, they have a subtle whitish-pink hue and when the petals open completely, the flowers are swathed by a supple white color fluff or tassel. The bogbean is also known as ‘bog hop’ and this aquatic plant obtained this alternative common name owing to the use of its leaves in the form of a flavoring agent in making beer.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC20, 2d4 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Beer Making: Bogbean is often used as a substitute for hops in beer making and as a preservative in other alchemical preparations. Bogbean can be added to any alchemical substance with a DC30 Craft (alchemy) check; success doubles the time the substance remains usable and failure ruins the substance completely.
  • Stomach Purge: Fresh Bogbean may induce vomiting. Ingested Poison (fresh (less than a few hours old) leaves, Fort DC12); 1 minute onset, 1 save/round for 10 rounds; Cure: 2 save; Effect: Nausea)


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C


Name: Caraway
Alternate Names: Moonfennel
Found: Tropical and temperate hills
Description: Caraway has an upright, grooved and branching stem that grows up to a height of 1.5 feet to 2 feet. The leaves of caraway are feathery and emerge from the stem in threes or opposite pairs. The stems of caraway terminate in clusters of minute white flowers that have a resemblance to those of carrots in bloom. The herb yields elongated, ridged seeds which are brownish in color.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of seeds
Notes: People popularly believe that caraway has the ability to avoid the theft of any article in which it is contained. Interestingly, this particular belief or property of caraway provided it with the power of being a love potion – it means that if you make your lover consume caraway, he or she will not be stolen from you. Keeping this virtue of the herb in view, rural folks fed caraway to their chickens, pigeons and geese to prevent them from wandering away.
Uses

  • Cooking: Caraway is used to enhance the flavor of cooking, and is often found in breads, beer, cakes, cheeses, and soups. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve caraway indefinitely for cooking.
  • Spell Component: Caraway can aid in the casting of charm spells. Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) caraway can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Enchantment (charm) spells. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 will preserve the caraway for up to 2d3 months.


Name: Carrot
Alternate Names: Bird’s Nest, Devil’s Lace
Found: Temperate hills and plains
Description: The plant possesses an erect stem and can reach three ft or one m in height when fully grown. The carrot bears feathery leaves and gives off small white flowers in season; it also bears flat green seeds. The swollen and fleshy taproot is often used as a vegetable, and ranges in color from white to orange to purplish-blue.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d3 uses of root, 1d3 uses of seeds
Uses

  • Food: The taproot of carrot is edible. 1 use of carrot root corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Carrot root can be preserved for up to a year with a DC12 Craft (alchemy) check
  • Defense against Poison: Carrots help remove poisons and toxins from the bloodstream. Adding fresh (less than a week old) carrot seeds while making antitoxin increases the Craft (alchemy) DC by 5, but doubles the effectiveness of the antitoxin.


Name: Cashew
Found: Tropical forest and jungle
Description: Cashew is an evergreen tree that grows up to a height of 30 feet and produces big oval-shaped leaves. Cashew bears flowers that have a yellow hue with pink stripes and emerge on the extended stems. The fruit of cashew is basically a coagulated stem. However, the actual fruit of this tree is found immediately under the thickened part of the stem and it encloses red or yellowish flesh that envelops the cashew nut. After the bark or shell of the nut is removed, it is mainly used as a food.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC20, 1d4 uses of nuts, 1d4 uses of fruit
Uses

  • Food: Both the fruit and the nuts of the cashew are edible. 1 use of either corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Cashew fruit can be preserved for up to a year with a DC12 Craft (alchemy) check; roasted cashew nuts will keep for 1d3 months if kept dry.
  • Ink: Juice extracted from the cashew fruit turns black upon exposure to air, and can be used to make an ink that is very hard to erase. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 check produces an ink that is extremely difficult to remove. The ink receives a +10 alchemical bonus to d20 checks (or a 50% bonus to percentile checks) to resist removal or smearing. Using this ink for scrolls or spellbooks increases the material cost of such items by 50%


Name: Chicory
Alternate Names: Blue Dandelion, Endive, Succory
Found: Temperate and cold plains and river banks
Description: The chicory is a perennial herb that can reach from three to more than five feet when fully grown. Chicory is easy to identify due to the lovely and striking blue colored flowers and the generalized unkempt appearance of the plant. The branches of the chicory are set off angularly from the main stem, giving the chicory a straggly appearance. The arrangement of leaves on the plant is rather sparse compared to other herbs of similar size. The stem of the plant is clasped by the bases of the leaves in a peculiar manner. Large and somewhat hairy leaves are seen at the base of the plant. In this appearance he plant resembles that of the dandelion to some extent; this is the reason that the chicory is known by the nickname of “blue dandelion”.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 2d4 uses of leaves, 1d3 uses of root
Uses

  • Drink: Chicory root is often dried, roasted, and ground; this ground is then brewed into a spicy coffee-like drink. A Craft (alchemy) DC15 check will prepare chicory root for brewing; the chicory grounds will last for 1d3 months if kept dry. Brewing the drink properly requires a DC5 Craft (alchemy) check.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed chicory leaves are often mixed with other pipe weeds, adding a potent and spicy flavor. A Craft (alchemy) DC14 check will preserve chicory leaves indefinitely for smoking.


Name: Clove
Found: Tropical forest
Description: The clove tree has a pyramidal shape. It is a pretty and broad leaved evergreen plant growing only in tropical climes. The clove tree when fully grown can often go up to thirty or forty feet in height. The characteristic strong aromatic fragrance produced by the living tree is mainly from as a result of the glands dotting the smooth and shiny leaves. The most fragrant parts of the tree are the tiny yellow flowers, which grow in loose clusters at the tips of the branches – the spice is made only from the plucked floral buds. The clove buds are an initial pink in color as they grow out, however, they turn a fiery red color at the base over a period of time – this is the point at which they are plucked to be sun dried and turned in to the deep reddish brown and familiar spice called cloves.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC8
Collection Check: Survival DC20, 1d4 uses of flower, 3d4 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Cooking: Clove flowers are added to food as a flavor enhancer. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve clove flowers indefinitely for cooking.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed clove leaves are often mixed with other pipe weeds, adding a sweet and mellow flavor. A Craft (alchemy) DC14 check will preserve clove leaves indefinitely for smoking.
  • Defense against Disease: Clove helps drive disease and plague from the body. Adding fresh (less than 1d4 days old) clove flowers while making antiplague increases the Craft (alchemy) DC by 5, but doubles the effectiveness of the antiplague.


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D


Name: Desert Tea
Alternate Names: Pick-Me-Up, Tumble Bush, Wind Witch
Found: Temperate and cold deserts and (dry) plains
Description: Desert Tea is a rounded, bushy, much branched annual that can stand up to 3 feet tall. Its stems are usually red or purple striped. Early in the season its leaves are long, string-like, and soft; later on they grow shorter, scale-like, and are tipped with a stiff spine. Inconspicuous green flowers grow at the base of the upper leaves, and each flower is accompanied by a pair of spiny protective thorns. At maturity the plant dries, turning brown, and breaks off at the base. Because it is (mostly) round it tumbles in the wind, dispersing its seeds as it travels.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC20 (if attached), DC10 (if tumbling)
Collection Check: Survival DC15 (if attached), 1d3 uses of leaves; Survival DC20 (if tumbling), 2d3 uses of seeds
Notes: Desert Tea is associated with movement, both because of the drug and because of the way it spreads its seeds.
Uses

  • Desert Tea: The leaves of the plant are used to produce a potent drug called Desert Tea. Users of this drug experience a potent high that sharpens the senses and speeds reaction times; however, the drug takes a significant toll on the body, and chronic use almost always leads to death. Consuming a dose of Desert Tea grants +4 to Perception checks and +2d3 to Dex for 30 minutes. Preparing a dose of Desert Tea requires a Craft (alchemy) DC25 check; actually brewing the tea, however, can be done by anyone. Side Effect: 1d4 points of Con damage per dose. Potential for Severe addiction Fort DC20 (If consumed fresh, the leaves provides +2 Perception and +2 Dex for 30 minutes, and the side effect is 1 points of Con damage per dose with potential addiction of Moderate at DC16.)
  • Spell Component: Desert Tea seeds can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Transmutation spells that increase movement speeds or grant new forms of movement. The seeds will naturally last up to a year without any specific preservation, but cannot be preserved further.


Name: Dill
Alternate Names: Dillweed
Found: Temperate and cold hills and plains
Description: Dill is an annual aromatic herb which grows to about thirty inches tall. The herb bears feathery leaves on an erect stem that is hollow inside. When in bloom, the herb bears a large number of yellow colored flowers in umbels on the stem.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of leaves and 1d3 uses of seeds
Notes: It is commonly believed that hanging a bunch of dill leaves over the door was supposed to protect one against witches and sorcery.
Uses

  • Cooking: Dill seeds are added to food as a flavor enhancer, adding a sweetly pungent and sharp flavor to meats, fishes, salads, stews, vegetables, sauces, and some breads. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve dill seeds indefinitely for cooking.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed dill leaves are often mixed with other pipe weeds, adding a sweet and pungent flavor. A Craft (alchemy) DC14 check will preserve dill leaves indefinitely for smoking.
  • Spell Component: Dill leaves can aid in the casting of spells that stop, break, or otherwise disrupt the flow of magic. Fresh (less than 3d6 hours old) dill leaves can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Abjuration spells whose main purpose is to dispel, suppress, or stop other magical effects. Examples include dispel magic, break enchantment, and antimagic field. A Craft (alchemy) DC30 will preserve dill leaves for up to 5d6 days.


Name: Dodder
Alternate Names: Devil’s Guts, Hellweed
Found: Tropical, temperate, and cold mountains, hills, and plains
Description: Dodder is a leafless parasitic vine that feeds off other plants through its reddish and orange threadlike stems which possess suckers to draw out nourishing fluids from the stem of the other plant. The dodder bears pinkish white colored flowers, characterized by possessing five sharp and spread out triangular lobes. The dodder flowers grow in dense clusters on the vine. Dodder spreads very fast and the seeds are viable for a long time, often staying in a dormant stage up to eight years at a stretch. Unsurprisingly, the dodder is a major nuisance weed for many farmers. They tend to call it as “hell weed” and the “devil’s guts”, allusions to the tendency of the dodder to overrun, overwhelm and strangle other plants. The dodder is a parasitic plant species and has typical parasitic adaptations: it does not have any leaves or roots, and is thus absolutely dependent upon the host plant for its survival. The dodder uses its parasitic suckers to suck nutrients; as such it is a climbing plant, and must grow close to the host plant. Once it reaches a plant, the dodder twines itself and penetrates the stem of the host with the suckers to obtain nutrients and to further grow on the plant. Dodder can be recognized even by the smell of the flowers; these possess a penetrating sweet perfume-like smell that is particularly strong in the evenings.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d6 uses of flowers, 1d4 uses of sucker tendrils
Uses

  • Perfume: The pungent odor of the dodder flowers can be used as the base for a perfumes. Making a simple perfume from dodder flowers requires a DC15 Craft (alchemy) check; a more subtle and exotic perfume (giving a +2 circumstance bonus to Diplomacy checks) can be made by adding a masterwork component (Craft (alchemy) DC20) at a cost of 50gp in other ingredients.
  • Spell Component: Dodder sucker tendrils can aid in the casting of spells that sap vitality and drain life. Fresh (less than 3d6 hours old) dodder tendrils can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Death descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC30 will preserve the tendrils for up to 3d10 days.


Name: Dog’s Mercury
Found: Temperate forest
Description: The dog’s mercury is a foul smelling perennial plant that has a rotund and furrowed stalk. The plant bears coarse, profound green hued leaves that grow opposite to one another on the stems. The leaves are oval-shaped and dented along the borders. The blooms of dog’s mercury are small and green colored and grow from the leaf axils. They blossom throughout spring. The dog’s mercury is a venomous plant that produces a pungent flavored sap.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d6 uses of stems
Uses

  • Dye: The stems of the dog’s mercury plant have an intense metallic blue hue resembling indigo when they are soaked in water for long. This coloring substance is basically permanent in nature, but can be transformed into red when it comes in contact with acids. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 check produces a dye that can be used to stain objects either red or blue (crafter’s choice); with a DC35 Craft (alchemy) check the dye may change from red to blue (and back again) when exposed to an environmental stimulus of the crafter’s choosing. (Magical, divine, or otherwise supernatural stimulus increases the check DC by 10.)
  • Poison: Dog’s mercury is fairly poisonous; consumption of the leaves leads to lethargy, convulsions, and possibly death. Usually dried and powdered. Craft (alchemy) DC15 to create Ingested Poison (Powder, Fort DC15); 30min onset, 1 save/min for 10 minutes; Cure: 2 saves; Effect: 1d2 Con damage (-1 to save DC for fresh leaves)


Name: Dragonblood
Alternate Names: Dragotree
Found: Tropical forest, jungle, and hills
Description: The Dragonblood tree normally grows between 30 to 100 feet high. Its heart-shaped leaves have raised veins with two glands at their base that change color with age from deep green to yellow/orange and red. What is significant is that when the trunk of the tree is either cut or injured, it gives out a resin like sap – making it appear as if the tree was suffering from hemorrhage, like a dragon bleeding.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC20, 1d4 uses of sap
Uses

  • Healing Agent: An ointment prepared from Dragonblood sap can be put over exterior wounds. This ointment dries within moments of application, forming a defensive ‘second skin’ over the wound to help it heal. Injuries so treated heal much faster than normal. This ointment can be prepared with a DC30 Craft (alchemy) check; once prepared, the ointment will keep for 2d6 months in a sealed container. When applied to a wounded individual this ointment adds a +10 alchemical bonus to Heal checks made to treat deadly wounds; in addition, successful use of the skill grants 1 additional hit point of healing per point the roll exceeds DC25. (Note: this ointment does not replace the two uses of a healer’s kit necessary for treating deadly wounds.)


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E


Name: Echinacea
Alternate Names: Red Sunflower
Found: Temperate plains
Description: The Echinacea herb is a perennial plant found growing on the prairie. The plant has a stout and bristly stem that bears a lot of hairy, and linear or lanceolate leaves, where are tapered at both ends and give it a distinctive shape. The Echinacea is characterized by its flowers, and each one of the distinctive and rich purple flowers bears 12 to 20 large and spread out, dull-purple rays marked by a conical disk consisting of numerous tubular florets in the middle. A pleasant sweetish smell and a faint aroma characterizes the Echinacea herb, and the herb leaves behind a tingling sensation in the mouth.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC25
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 2d4 uses of flower, 1d6 uses of root
Uses

  • Wound Cleanse: Echinacea promotes healing in wounds that won’t heal, and can overcoming disease or magic preventing a wound from closing. This salve can even cure Bog Rot under the right conditions. Preparing an echinacea salve requires a DC30 Craft (alchemy) check; when applied to a wound that resist natural and magical healing (such as those inflicted by clay golems) it attempts to remove whatever condition is restricting normal healing. Treat this effect as a Cure spell cast by a 15th level caster, except it does not act to heal damage. It can also be used as a material component in casting a Cure spell against such a condition; in this case it grants a +5 circumstance bonus to the caster level check to overcome the affliction. Against Bog Rot the salve grants an immediate save (with no bonus); success indicates that the echinacea salve has cured the disease. If the save fails, additional applications of echinacea salve will not grant additional saves. Once prepared, the salve will only keep for 2d12 hours; it is usually prepared when needed.


Name: Elder
Alternate Names: Elderberry, Pipe Tree
Found: Tropical and temperate forest and hills
Description: Elder is a bushy shrub-like plant that can reach a few feet in height. The flowers are usually formed in aromatic clusters of many star-shaped and white colored flowers, which can vary from bunches with flat-topped to the globular types of arrangement. When ripened, these will mature to produce berrylike and limb sagging fruits which can range in color from stark blue to an amber, and even red to a complete black – the variation in the taste of these elderberries is also markedly different. The elderberry consists of three to five single seeded portions. The taste of the elderberries is not remarkable and improves when taken along with other edible berries.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d6 uses of berries and 1d4 uses of stems
Uses

  • Arrows: The long stems of the elder tend to be very straight, and are sometimes used for making arrow shafts as such stems become woodier with age. Elder stems provide a +10 circumstance bonus to Craft (bows) checks (including any masterwork component) to make arrows.
  • Musical instruments: The woody stems can be used to craft flutes, pan pipes, and other instruments by removing the soft pith center. Elder stems provide a +10 circumstance bonus to Craft checks (including any masterwork component) to create wooden instruments.
  • Food: The berries are edible although eating too many berries is believed to cause digestive problems. Traditional wisdom suggest that only a few berries can be eaten raw at any one time so as to avoid disrupting the stomach. 1 use of elderberries corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Elderberries can be preserved for up to a year with a DC10 Craft (alchemy) check; eating more than one use of elderberries in a 24 hour period requires, after 30 minutes, a Fort save vs DC10+2 per use consumed (including the first two); failure means the character becomes nauseated for 1d4 rounds, then sickened. Any further food consumption will result in automatic nausea for 1d4 rounds. This abates after he or she has had 8 hours of rest with nothing to eat.


Name: Evening Primrose
Alternate Names: Evening Star, Night Willow, the Midwife’s Assistant
Found: Temperate Plains
Description: Evening primrose is a biennial weed known for the large numbers of very fertile seeds it produces. It is usually a biennial or a winter annual, but may rarely occur as a summer annual. Its leaves have deeply toothed edges and a distinctive white mid-vein. The upper leaf surfaces are covered with small hairs. The stems tend to be reddish in color, and can stand as high as 32 inches tall. It produces many showy yellow or red flowers; the seeds grow in rows within a capsule-like curved fruit that extends up to 1.5 inches in length.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of seeds
Uses

  • Pregnancy and Delivery: The oil of evening primrose seeds can have a variety of effects on pregnant women, depending upon how the oil is prepared. For this reason, evening primrose is called the midwife’s assistant. Evening primrose oil can be prepared with a DC20 Craft (alchemy) check; the oil lasts indefinitely, and gives a +10 alchemical bonus to Heal checks made during the delivery of a baby.


Name: Eyebright
Found: Temperate plains and swamps
Description: Eyebright is a hardy and small annual plant characterized by the presence of deeply cut leaves. The eyebright is hemi parasitic — food gathering nodules are found on the roots which attach to the roots of any plant nearby in order to steal nutrition. The plant bears many small flowers which are white or purplish in color and at times variegated with a yellowish tinge. The flowers resemble bloodshot human eyes due to the presence of the various spots and stripes – giving the herb its name.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC22
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 2d4 uses of leaves
Notes: The peculiar appearance of the flowers has come to associate the plant with eyes and seeing.
Uses

  • Spell Component: Eyebright leaves can aid in the casting of spells that augment eyesight or make things more visible. Eyebright leaves are the main ingredient in an eye ointment that provides +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Divination spells that affect vision, such as any of the Detect spells. This ointment is, in effect, the one required for the spell true seeing, and thus does not give a Spellcraft bonus unless two doses are used. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 is necessary to craft the ointment; once made, it is good for 3d6+6 months.


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F


Name: Fairy’s Glove
Alternate Names: Deadmen’s Bells, Witch’s Bells
Found: Temperate and cold forest and swamps
Description: This herbal plant can reach six feet in height, and has a straight stem without branches. During the spring bloom, fairy’s glove flowers hang in bunches on the stem – the flowers have a dull pink or purple coloration, and often come with white spots on the corolla. The large sized leaves of the fairy’s glove possess distinct and prominent veins running along the lamina. The shape of the blossoms give the herb its name, as the glove shaped flowers resembled the gloved fingers of a small person.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d3 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Poison: Fairy’s glove leaves causes the heart to palpitate and beat arhythmically, eventually seizing and coming to a stop. Dried and powdered it is known as the poison digitalis. Craft (alchemy) DC16 to create Ingested Poison (Powder, Fort DC16); 1 min onset, 1 save/round for 6 rounds; Cure: 2 save; Effect: 1d6 Con damage (-3 to save DC for fresh leaves)


Name: Fireweed
Alternate Names: Blood Vine, Blooming Sally, Willow Herb
Found: Temperate hills and mountains
Description: Fireweed is a perennially growing herb that generally grows up to a height of around 28 inches to 5 feet. This herb produces big flowers of purple hue. The fruit is like a brown capsule that is open at both ends, and discharges oval shaped seeds. The name of the plant comes from the fact that they flourish on lands that are either disturbed in some manner or have been burned over.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d4 uses of stems, 1d4 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Rope Making: The outer stem of the fireweed plant yields a fiber that may be employed to prepare strong fiber ropes. Rope made of fireweed has 3 hitpoints, but otherwise is identical to hemp rope.
  • Spell Component: Fireweed leaves can aid in the casting of spells that invoke or control fire. Fresh (less than 1d2 days old) dill leaves can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Fire descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC20 will preserve fireweed leaves for up to 3d4 months.


Name: Fleur-de-lis
Alternate Names: Blue Iris, Poison Flag, Snake Lily
Found: Temperate swamp
Description: The fleur-de-lis has two levels of sword-shaped, elongated, slender leaves. Each leaf is rather short compared to the whole plant. The leaves are creased along the midribs, giving it the shape of an overlying horizontal fan. The stems are straight, not much above the ground and usually possess basal leaves which are almost half an inch in width. The root has a tubular shape in the bottom half and gradually becomes compressed near the crown. When the root dries several crack-like rings appear on it are small with a purple tinge, while the rest of the root exterior has a deep brown hue and is wrinkled longitudinally. The rootlets spreading from the main root are elongated, simple and thin.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC16
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d6 uses of root
Uses

  • Poison: The fresh root of fleur-de-lis tends to have a laxative effect, resulting in purging and internal distress. Fresh fleur-de-lis: Ingested Poison (Fort DC20); 5min onset, 1 save/min for 6 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Initial Effect: Sickened; Secondary Effect: 1d3 STR damage, 1d3 DEX damage. Every hour of age of the fleur-de-lis root reduces the save DC by 1. It is impossible to distill or preserve this poison alchemically.
  • Pain Relief: Properly prepared root of fleur-de-lis can be used as a potent painkiller and analgesic. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 prepares a liquid broth that acts similarly to the delay pain spell; the effect lasts for 30 minutes. In a sealed container the broth will remain potent for 1d3 months.


Name: Florentine Iris
Alternate Names: Orris Root
Found: Tropical hills and mountains
Description: Florentine iris is basically a perennial plant having a broad root. Also known as the orris root, this plant has a straight flowering stem that grows up to a height of two feet and bears leaves that are typically sword or lance shaped. The plant produces big flowers that generally appear in pairs at the apex of the stem, the petals of which are white hued, having a light lilac trace and a yellowish ‘beard’. The plant itself releases an aroma akin to violet.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC16
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d4 uses of roots
Uses

  • Perfume: The delicate sweet order of the florintine iris can be extracted from the root for use in perfumes. Making a simple perfume from florintine iris requires a DC15 Craft (alchemy) check; a more subtle and exotic perfume (giving a +2 circumstance bonus to Diplomacy checks) can be made by adding a masterwork component (Craft (alchemy) DC20) at a cost of 50gp in other ingredients.
  • Beauty Cream: The root can be used to produce a creamy waxy substance known as orris butter. Orris butter can be used to get rid of freckles or blotches; similarly, it lessens the effect of wrinkles and increases the general elasticity of the skin. When used regularly it gives the appearance and attitude of youth, although over the long term can lead to addiction and mental impairment. Rubbing orris butter into the skin requires 10 minutes, imparting a warming sensation. Once applied, it grants +1d4+1 Cha for 2d4 hours. Side Effect: 1d3-1 points of Intelligence damage per dose. Potential for Moderate addiction Fort DC18


Name: Fumewort
Alternate Names: Earthsmoke, Wax Dolls
Found: Tropical and temperate forests, hills, and plains
Description: Fumwart is an annually growing herb that generally grows up to a height of 30 inches. It has thin stems and several wilted branches that bear gray-green hued leaves that are usually split into triangular shaped jagged leaflets. Because the leaves have an ethereal look akin to curling smoke rising from the ground when one observes them from a distance, the plant is known as fumewort or earthsmoke. The flowers appear at the terminals of the branches in the form of extended bunches of petite, tube-shaped blooms that are purplish-pink having crimson tips, and are generally about a quarter of an inch in diameter. Each flower has two lips and is spurred with sepals that run about a fourth of the flower’s length. The flowers give way to tiny, dry, hard, single-seeded fruits that do not open even on ripening.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d6 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of flowers
Uses

  • Dye: The flowers of the fumewort plant can yield a bright yellow dye. A Craft (alchemy) DC15 check produces a dye that can be used to stain objects yellow.
  • Incense: Fumewort leaves are often prepared as incense and burned, bringing a calm and relaxing therapeutic effect to those who breathe it. Using excessive amounts may result in susceptibility to hypnotic after effects. A Craft (alchemy) DC18 creates the incense: Inhaled Poison (incense, Fort DC15); 1 save/round for 6 rounds; Cure: 2 consecutive saves; Initial Effect: identical to the spell Calm Emotions; Secondary Effect: -4 penalty to Will saves. (Consuming fresh leaves reduced save DC by 3; smoking in a pipe confines the effect to the smoker, but increases the save DC by 3)


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G


Name: Garlic
Alternate Names: White Garlic, Pink Garlic, Purple Garlic
Found: Tropical (Pink and Purple) and temperate (White) hills and plains
Description: The garlic plant itself is not a remarkable herb on first sight, growing about two feet tall with flat, long, and pointed leaves – the main repute of the garlic lies in its underground storage bulb. The herb bears flowers in mid summer and the colors of the flowers can range from pink to white in different varieties. Garlic flowers are edible and are consumed in many places. The garlic plant comes in many varieties and cultivars – each with its distinct characteristics. Garlic varieties with large pinkish or purple skinned bulbs grow in tropical regions, whereas those growing in temperate climes tend to have smaller white bulbs.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 3d4 uses of cloves
Notes: The smell of the garlic is of much renown and has attracted a lot of commentary; it has a reputation for being able to ward away vampires.
Uses

  • Cooking: Garlic clove is often either ground or chopped and added to food as a flavor enhancer. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve garlic cloves indefinitely as a powder for cooking.
  • Vampire Deterrent: Lacing an area with fresh (less than 2 days old) garlic will discourage vampires from entering the affected area. One use of garlic cloves will treat one 5′ × 5′ square for 24 hours. Each additional use treating the same 5′ × 5′ square adds +2 to the Will DC for the vampire to overcome its revulsion.


Name: Ginger
Found: Tropical jungle
Description: The ginger has a slender stem; ginger is a perennial plant, about 24 to 39 inches in height. Compared to the second and following stems, the first stems are lengthier and also bear beautiful and fragrant flowers. The ginger flowers are greenish yellow and streaked with purple down the sides. Dark green ginger leaves are characterized by a famous midrib that is sheathed at the growing base. The seeds of the ginger appear in the rare fruiting body. The root is white to yellow in color and bears thick lobes – it is also very aromatic, a property used in culinary and herbal processes. An unusual exception to this mild color range is one ginger variety, which has a characteristic blue ring, lying in circles inside the fleshy interior – this is one of the most prized varieties of ginger.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC16
Collection Check: Survival DC20, 1d4 uses of root
Notes: Ginger is associated with passion and arousal, due to its ability to warm the skin and induce a flush in the face, neck, and upper chest. Because of this ginger is also sometimes used as an aphrodisiac.
Uses

  • Cooking: Ground ginger root is often added to food as a flavor enhancer. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve ground ginger root indefinitely for cooking.
  • Spell Component: Ginger can be used in the casting of spells meant to inflame the passions. Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) ginger root can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Emotion descriptor, as long as the spell is being used to inflame or excite the target’s emotions. A spellcaster attempting to use ginger root to calm or suppress a target’s emotions automatically fails his Spellcraft check, and increases the chances of the magic going awry by 10%. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 will preserve ginger root for this purpose for 2d8 months.


Name: Goat’s Rue
Found: Temperate plain and swamp
Description: Goat’s rue is a bushy perennial shrub. The plant has a smooth and hollowed out erect branching stems and can grow to five feet in height. The goat’s rue has bright green compound leaves, and each leaf typically made up of thirteen to seventeen lance shaped leaflets. These leaflets are one to two inches in length each. The goat’s rue bears flowers that range in color from pure white to a lilac hue, these flowers are grown in spikes and form red brown seedpods during the fall. Each seedpod contains two to six seeds, which are kidney shaped.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d4 uses of flower
Notes: The lactation in farmed goats and milk cattle is boosted by feeding them this herb; this is a common practice for increasing milk production in farm animals. From this traditional use of the herb sprang the belief that goat’s rue may also stimulate breast development and lactation in human females as well.
Uses

  • Milk Production: Flowers of goat’s rue will increase the production of milk in lactating animals and people; it has no effect on those who are not already lactating. Flowers from a goat’s rue plant will increase milk production if the person or animal succeeds at a DC10 Fortitude save. The amount of the increase is (2d20+50)%, minus 10% per full day of age of the flowers. The flowers can be prepared with a Craft (alchemy) check versus DC15; success reduces the penalty to 10% per week, but failure ruins the flowers completely.


Name: Goldenseal
Alternate Names: Orange Root, Yellow Eye
Found: Temperate forest and swamps
Description: The goldenseal plant, also known as orange root, is characterized by having a thick and yellow colored rootstock that bears an erect and hairy stem (which can reach a foot in height) and with branching stems at the top. The herb bears a small leaf and a flower on one branch, while the other branch is characterized by the presence of a large leaf. Fully grown goldenseal leaves are about six to eight inches in diameter, while each leaf tends to have from five to nine lobes when mature. During April or May, the plant gives out a peculiar greenish-white and unattractive flower. This flower has a very characteristic form and is followed by the growth of a large and fleshy berry-like head. This will ripen to a very bright red during the autumn months, and tends to look like a rather large raspberry. This fruiting body is composed of ten to twenty small shining and very hard seeds which are black in color. The characteristic rootstock of the fresh goldenseal is bright yellow and bears many fibrous rootlets from the sides. When the rootstock is dry, these roots can become very brittle and can be very easily break off when the root stocks are moved around.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of root
Uses

  • Mouth Wash: A solution of goldenseal root can be used to rinse out the mouth; this solution will not only clean the teeth and wash away excess food, it also stimulates the gums and tongue. A DC15 Craft (alchemy) check will prepare this solution. Using the solution daily will protect against the effects of cavities, bad breath, cold sores, and other issues of the mouth.
  • Spell Component: Fresh (less than 1d4 days old) goldenseal root can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Language-dependent descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC22 will preserve the goldenseal root for up to 2d8 months for this purpose.


Name: Grindelia
Alternate Names: Gumplant
Found: Tropical hills
Description: This plant is a perennial herb that can grow to three ft when fully mature. The herb is characterized by possessing triangular leaves and yellow orange flowers that resemble the flowers of the daisy in appearance. A persistent balsamic odor can be detected from all parts of the grindelia plant.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d3 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Protection against contact poisons: The sticky gum-like sap from crushed grindelia leaves can be used to prepare an ointment that, when rubbed onto the skin, forms a barrier against irritants and poisons. A Craft (alchemy) check versus DC25 produces the ointment; when used it provides a +10 alchemy bonus to initial Fortitude saves vs contact poisons. It does not help against ongoing damage from contact poisons, however. One application will remain effective for up to an hour; unused doses of the ointment last 2d4 months.


Name: Guava
Alternate Names: Enandi, Tokal
Found: Tropical forest and jungle
Description: The guava is a shade tree that normally grow up to a height of thirteen feet and bears large leaves with conspicuous veins. The leaves grow in pairs opposite each other on the slender but firm branches. The plant also bears diminutive white hued flowers that possess several stamens maturing into smoothed or pear-shaped, yellowish fruits containing numerous seeds. The flesh of the guava fruit has a pink or yellowish hue and is very delectable as well as nutritious. The guava tree is perennial with plenty of leaves and, hence, provides excellent shade. Guava trees are distinct as they have typical slender, smooth, copper hued barks that exfoliate revealing a green colored layer below.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 2d4 uses of fruit, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of bark
Uses

  • Food: The fruit of the guava may be eaten fresh when ripe or thickened to prepare jam, jelly or marmalade. 1 use of guava fruit corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Guava can be preserved for up to a year with a DC10 Craft (alchemy) check
  • Leathercraft: People exploit the guava tree barks for tanning hides. A DC20 Craft (alchemy) check prepares a tanning solution from the bark of the guava that provides a +10 alchemical bonus to Craft checks making items that are predominantly made of leather. (This bonus is also applied to any rolls for a masterwork component.) One use of solution is required per week of work, with a minimum of one use per item crafted.
  • Digestive Cleanse: A tincture made with the leaves of the guava can be used to clean and calm the stomach and digestive tract; it will also suppress coughs and calm the throat and lungs. Preparing the tincture of guava requires a DC25 Craft (alchemy) check; when drunk by a character that is sickened or nauseated the tincture grants an immediate additional save to shake off the condition. If the save fails, additional doses of the tincture will not grant additional saves. The tincture stays usable for 4d6 days once prepared.


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H


Name: Heather
Found: Temperate and cold forest and swamp
Description: The heather plant is an evergreen shrub that has many branching stems and can reach one to two feet in length when full grown. It is characterized by the possession of minute and needlelike leaves, each of which is about one sixteenth to one eight of an inch in length. The leaves are borne in opposite pairs and are clumped together in four rows along the short green twigs on the branches of the plant. Most leaves do not bear any hair; however, they can at times be downy, often lying in overlapping positions in four vertical rows along the twigs on the branches. Leaves have a dark green color when tender, but tend to turn brown as they mature. The stems of the heather are woody, wiry and pliable. Tender stems are initially covered with dense hair, these become hairless and smooth in later stages of growth and maturity. The heather bears purplish pink flowers which have a bell shaped corolla that is two mm across, formed by the joining of four purple colored petals into a tube. The corolla is shorter than the four purple sepal leaves, each of which is a sixteenth of an inch in length. Heather flowers are borne on a narrow shaped and leafy stem that can grow to nine cm in length. The fruits of the heather are very tiny, rounded and hairy capsules with four cells inside each fruit. The minute seeds, each a quarter of an inch in length, are strongly meshed in the fruit.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of flowers. A separate DC20 Survival check finds a nearby beehive. 75% chance the hive is regular bumblebees (DC22 Survival check collects 2d4 uses of heather honey; failure collects 1d4 uses of heather honey but collectors suffer 1 point of hp damage per point by which they failed the skill check); 25% chance of a hive of wasps (Survival DC26 to collect 2d6 uses of heather honey unmolested; failure indicates no honey was collected, and a wasp swarm emerges for every 2 by which the roll missed the DC, to a maximum of 8).
Uses

  • Dye: The flowers of the heather plant can yield a bright yellow dye. A Craft (alchemy) DC15 check produces a dye that can be used to stain objects yellow.
  • Heather Honey: Heather honey is dark brownish in color, but has a subtle and colorful flavor; it is often used in making the most prized of meads and wines. Heather honey can be mixed with non-alchemical non-magical beverages while they are being made with a DC20 Craft (alchemy) check; if successful, the taste of the drink becomes exquisitely complex, easily doubling (or possibly tripling, with a DC30 Craft (alchemy) check) the asking price.


Name: Hemlock
Alternate Names: Devil’s Plant, Poison Parsley
Found: Temperate plains and swamps
Description: Hemlock is basically a tall plant that grows up to a height of 6 feet from a split and light yellowish root. The plant has a strong and vivid green stem which is even and marked with purple or profound reddish blotches. The leaves of hemlock appear alternately, have extended stalks, and are split along the midrib into opposed pairs of leaflets. These leaflets are further divided and sub-divided in the same way. On the other hand, leaves growing on the upper parts of the plant are comparatively smaller and almost without any stalk. However, they have short expanded footstalk that clasp to the stem, generally appearing opposite to each other or in groups of three. These leaves are oblong-shaped, somewhat smooth, and have a pale green hue with jagged edges, where every tooth is tipped with a miniscule, prickly white point. The plant bears petite white umbrella-shaped cluster of flowers that are lacy. The flower clusters are somewhat small, around 1 to 2 inches in width, and plentiful. These flowers give rise to fruits or seeds that are similar to caraway. The plants bears small fruits, approximately one-eighth of an inch in length, are broad, creased and compacted sideways, but otherwise having a smooth surface. During the first year of the plant’s growth, it produces abundant leaves and the leaves at the base of the plant are extremely large, sometime growing up to two feet in length. The whole hemlock plant is bitter to taste and it has an unpleasant mousy smell that is particularly obvious when the leaves or other parts of the plants are crushed. The fruits as well as the seeds of hemlock too have a very distinct smell and flavour.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC26
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of leaves
Notes: Like the plant’s odour and taste, even the poisonous property of hemlock is prevalent in all its parts. However, it is said that the poisonous property is comparatively less in roots of the plant. People have suffered hemlock poisoning for consuming its leaves mistaking them to be those of parsley, the roots for parsnip as well as eating the hemlock seeds mistaking them to be anise seeds. In addition, numerous children too have suffered hemlock poisoning when they made whistles using the hollow stems of the plant, which ought to be completely removed from the pastures and meadows, as domestic animals also have died following consumption of the hemlock stems and leaves. However, it is surprising to note that goats are able to consume the plant’s leaves and stems without experiencing any unpleasant effect. The plant is also considered to be ‘sinister’ since it was considered to be a preferred plant of the witches who collected it for their poisonous brews.
Uses

  • Poison: Hemlock is a poison, acting by paralyzing the body’s ability to move – rendering one immobile. Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) hemlock leaves act as Ingested Poison (hemlock leaves, Fort DC15); 10min onset, 1 save/min for 6 minutes: Cure: 2 saves; Effect: 1d6 Dex damage, creatures reduced to 0 Dex begin to suffocate. A Craft (alchemy) DC18 concentrates the poison, increasing the Fort save to DC18.
  • Spell Component: Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) hemlock leaves can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Evil descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 will preserve hemlock leaves for up to 3d4 months.


Name: Holly
Found: Cold hills and mountains
Description: Holly is an evergreen tree that normally grows up to a height of 70 feet. This tree produces shiny, rubbery, alternate leaves that are spiky at the edges. Holly produces diminutive white color flowers, but only female holly trees produce berries.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d4 uses of bark, 1d3 uses of berries
Notes: Some believe that the white flowers of holly have the aptitude to transform water into ice! People also believed that planting holly trees near one’s house protected them from lightning as well as the evils of witchcraft.
Uses

  • Birdlime: Holly bark can be used to prepare a sticky substance known as birdlime. Traditionally birdlime was spread on branches or twigs to entangle and catch any birds that landed there; however, many other uses for this substance have since been found. A Craft (alchemy) DC24 check produces birdlime. (Failing this check by 10 or more means the alchemist must make a DC24 Reflex save to avoid ruining his equipment with sticky residue.) Four uses of birdlime may be spread on a 10’ by 10’ surface as a trap with a successful Craft (traps) at DC20 to catch those who touch it. (Failing this check by 10 or more means the trapmaker has accidentally subject himself to the trap.)
  • Religous Use: Holly is often used as part of the holy symbols of those who revere nature instead of (or in addition to) the gods. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve holly berries as a spell focus indefinitely.
  • Spell Component: Fresh (less than 1d2 days old) holly berries can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Cold descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC24 will preserve the holly for up to 3d4 months.


Name: Hops
Found: Temperate and cold forests and swamps
Description: The hops plant is a climbing vine which gives out scaly and cone shaped fruits called hops (from which the name for the whole plant is drawn). The hops cone (the fruit) bears numerous glandular hairs on the surface; these hairs possess a resinous bitter principle which allows extensive utilization of the hops in processes such as brewing.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC10
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d4 uses of fruit
Notes: People who plucked the hops fruit seemed to tire out easily; this was probably due to the accidental transfer of some of the hop resin on the hands to the mouths of the workers.
Uses

  • Beer Making: Hops is usually used as a preservative and flavoring agent in beer making. One use of hops is necessary per dose of beer produced.
  • Poison: Fresh hops has a sedative action when consumed, or even when something that has come into contact with the resin is placed against the face. Alchemists can concentrate this effect into either an oil sedative or into a more potent blood-borne sedative. Fresh (less than 2d4 hours old) hops acts as Contact Poison (fruit, Fort DC10); 1 save/minute for 2 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Initial Effect: fatigued for 1 minute; Secondary Effect: fatigued for 10 minutes. If already fatigued upgrade to exhausted; if already exhausted then upgrade to unconscious). A DC12 Craft (alchemy) creates Contact Poison (oil, Fort DC12); 1 save/minute for 2 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Initial Effect: exhausted for 1 minute; Secondary Effect: exhausted for 1d4 hours. If already exhausted then upgrade to unconscious). A DC14 Craft (alchemy) creates Injury Poison (oil, Fort DC14); 1 save/minute for 2 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Initial Effect: unconscious for 1 minute; Secondary Effect: unconscious for 2d4 hours. (Note: This last injury based poison is effective Drow poison.)


Name: Hyssop
Found: Temperate forest and hills
Description: The hyssop is a perennial shrub-like herb and is characterized by possessing slender and stiff stems. It grows to about a yard in height when mature. The hyssop bears opposite leaves on the stems; these are narrow and pointed in shape. It also bears blue to purplish blue colored flowers as small-one sided clusters that are set along the upper portion on the stems of the herb. The leaves and flowers of the hyssop plant contain significant amounts of volatile oils; this endows the parts of the plant with a distinct “camphor like” aroma and also imparts a specific bitter taste to the plant. Bees are attracted to the rather strong fragrance of the plant; the nectar is utilized by bees to manufacture a very sweet smelling type of honey.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d4 uses of flowers, 1d4 uses of leaves. A separate DC20 Survival check finds a nearby beehive. 60% chance the hive is regular bumblebees (DC20 Survival check collects 1d6 uses of hyssop honey; failure collects 1d3 uses of hyssop honey but collectors suffer 1 point of hp damage per point by which they failed the skill check); 30% chance of a hive of wasps (Survival DC30 to collect 1d6 uses of hyssop honey unmolested; failure indicates no honey was collected, and a wasp swarm emerges for every 2 by which the roll missed the DC, to a maximum of 12). 10% chance it is a hive of giant bees (treat as a dungeon with a treasure of giant bee hyssop honey).
Uses

  • Cooking: Hyssop leaves are added to food to add a minty and refreshing flavor. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve hyssop leaves indefinitely for cooking.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed hyssop leaves and flowers are added to other pipe weeds to create a mix of strong and complex flavors. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve hyssop indefinitely for smoking.
  • Incense: Hyssop flowers are often prepared as incense and burned; the strong smell is believed to ward away foul and toxic odors. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 creates a hyssop incense that gives a +10S alchemical bonus to Fort saves vs. stench- special attacks. Smoking the flowers has no effect, other than that listed under Pipe Weed above.
  • Hyssop Honey: Regular hyssop honey has an amazing ability to heal chronic coughs and colds; giant bee hyssop honey is even more effective. One use of hyssop honey immediately heals 1d4 points of damage and provides a +5 circumstance bonus to the creature’s next Fortitude save (within 24 hours) against disease; one use of giant bee hyssop honey heals 2d4 points of damage, cures 1 point of ability damage, and provides a +10 circumstance bonus to the next Fortitude save (within 24 hours). Once collected, hyssop honey lasts indefinitely.
  • Spell Component: Giant bee hyssop honey can aid in the casting of spells that bind and restrict a creature’s will. Giant bee hyssop honey provides +10 circumstance bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Enchantment(compulsion) spells. Once collected, hyssop honey lasts indefinitely.


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Name: Iporuru
Alternate Names: Dreamwalk Tree
Found: Tropical swamps
Description: The Iporuru plant is a shrub-like small tree that can grow to about 24 to 30 feet in height when fully mature. The iporuru has a light brown colored bark and bears violet colored flowers when in full bloom.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC20
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of bark
Uses

  • Dreamwalk: Iporuru has hallucinogenic compounds which can be distilled into the recreational drug Dreamwalk. Dreamwalk is highly addictive, and damages both body and mind over long periods of time. Dreamwalk is a powder made from the bark of the iporuru that, when inhaled, twists the perceptions and muddles the mind, producing vivid hallucinations and a feeling of euphoria. Anyone taking a dose of Iporuru gains an immunity to fear and an immunity to pain for 3d6+12 minutes; during that same time the user experiences random hallucinations and a -5 penalty to saving throws against illusions and mind-affecting effects. Preparing dreamwalk requires a Craft (alchemy) DC32 check. Side Effect: 1d3 points of Wisdom, Intelligence, or Charisma damage (roll randomly) per dose and 1d3 points of Strength damage per dose. Potential for Severe addiction Fort DC24
  • Spell Component: Iporuru can aid in the casting of spells that alter or affect perception and sense. Fresh (less than 2d6 days old) iporuru bark can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast Illusion spells. A Craft (alchemy) DC29 will preserve the iporuru bark for up to 3d8 months.


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Name: Jaborandi
Alternate Names: Slobberweed
Found: Tropical jungles
Description: The herbal plant known as the jaborandi can reach heights of four to five feet tall. It is a perennial shrub that has distinct grayish-green colored large leaves that are covered with many minute oil secreting glands. When any leaf of the jaborandi tree is held up to sunlight or any other source of light, the surface of the lamina appears to be sprinkled with numerous translucent dots, almost as if many tiny insect pests were attacking the lamina surface at once. Every individual dot on the surface of the leaf is a gland that exudes a rich and useful oil. The plant has a smooth textured and grayish colored bark; it bears small sized reddish purple colored flowers when in bloom.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC20
Collection Check: Survival DC25, 1d4 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Expectorant: When eaten the leaves of the jaborandi induces intense salivation. It is from this effect that the herb has gained the nickname “slobberweed”.
  • Waterproofing: The oil of the jaborandi readily repels water. While crafting other items jaborandi oil can be added to impart a measure of waterproofing to the item. Any time a Craft check is made for the item an additional Craft (alchemy) check at DC20 must be added; failure on this Craft check is treated as identical to failure on the original Craft check. One use of jaborandi leaves is necessary for each check made (minimum 1). Items treated with jaborandi can be submerged up to 10’ in water indefinitely with no ill effects; submersion at deeper depths will cause the waterproofing to fail after 2d10 minutes. Adding jaborandi to birdlime negates the ability to wash off the birdlime with water; this also increases the CR of any trap made with that birdlime by 2.


Name: Jambul
Alternate Names: Java Plum
Found: Tropical forests
Description: Compared to other tree species, jambul grows very rapidly, quickly reaching its full height within forty years. The jambul is a tall tree with a wide range of heights in different places it grows in; in some places it can reach heights of one hundred ft. The spread of the tree is thirty six ft on average, and the typical diameter of the trunk is two or three ft across. The jambul tree normally forks into multiple trunks that radiate a short distance from the ground around the tree. The jambul tree has a distinct appearance as the bark covering the lower part of the tree is discolored, rough textured, cracked and flaking, the bark texture further up the tree is smooth with a light gray coloration. The arrangement of the leaves is opposite; each is about two to ten inches in length with a width of one to four inches across. The evergreen leaves of the jambul tree have an oblong shape, being oval or elliptic, and may be blunt or tapering to a point at the tips. The leaves of the plant are pinkish in coloration when tender, however, as they begin to mature, they turn leathery, glossy and dark green colored on the upper surface, with a light green coloration underneath. Each leaf is marked by a conspicuous and yellowish midrib running through the skin. Jambul bears fragrant smelling flowers in clusters that are one to four inches in size. Each flower is about half an inch across, with a length of one to two inches. The base stem of each flower has a particular funnel shape formed from the unison of four to five petals. The flowers are white in color at first, as they mature they become rose pink in coloration, the flowers are shed soon after and only the numerous stamens are left on the stalk. The jambul bears fruits in clusters of different sizes, each cluster may hold ten to forty round or oblong, often curved fruits or just a few. Each fruit is half an inch to two inches in length. When tender the fruit is usually green or light magenta in color, as it ripens slowly it becomes dark purple or completely black in coloration. Each fruit is characterized by a smooth and thin skin, which is glossy and has an adherent surface. The fruit has a very juicy white inner pulp. Each fruit normally encloses a single, oblong shaped, green or brown colored seed pod that can be about one and a half inches long. The seed pod contains two to five seeds tightly compressed inside the leathery coat. The taste of the fruit ranges from acidic to somewhat sweet depending upon the soil.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC20
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d4 uses of fruit, 1d6 uses of bark, 1d2 uses of wood
Uses

  • Food: The fruit of the jambul are edible. 1 use of jambul fruit corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Jambul fruit can be preserved for up to a year with a DC11 Craft (alchemy) check
  • Dye: The extracts of the jambul bark can give durable brown colored dyes that come in various hues, which depend on the mordant used in the process of dye making and the strength of the bark extract. A Craft (alchemy) DC14 check produces a dye that can be used to stain objects various shades of brown (crafter’s choice).
  • Woodcraft: The heartwood obtained from the jambul is quite hard if it is kiln dried; the wood is difficult to work with but polishes well and has a good sheen. The wood is very durable to long term water exposure and is also resistant to borers and termites. The wood of the jambul tree is commonly used to make beams and rafters, in bridges, in the manufacture of boats and oars, in the making of sailing masts, troughs, to line wells, in the manufacture of agricultural implements, and to make solid cart wheels. Furniture is also occasionally made from the wood of the jambul. Any predominantly wooden item made with jambul wood is automatically considered masterwork; however, the Craft checks required to make the item must meet the higher of the original Craft DC+5 or DC20. One use of jambul wood is required per pound of weight for the item. Items made of jambul wood have 20% more hitpoints than a similar item made of regular wood.


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Name: Knotweed
Alternate Names: Armstrong, Cowgrass, Pigweed
Found: Temperate plains and coastlines
Description: Knotweed is an annually growing herb that generally grows in a horizontal position. The herb gives out stems that are unkempt and growing up to 6 inches to 12 inches in length forming a thick mat. This plant produces leaves whose shape varies from being elliptical to oval and growing up to one fourth of an inch to half an inch in length. The leaves of knotweed appear alternately from joint, also called “knot”, on the stem. The plant produces minute clusters of flowers whose color varies from light green to pink or lilac.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d3 uses of leaves and 1d4 uses of stems
Notes: Knotweed has a very intricate root system and is able to dig into the most compressed soils. Once knotweed is well established on any place, it is extremely hard to get rid of it.
Uses

  • Animal Feed: Both pigs and cattle like this herb, hence, it is often referred to as the pigweed and cowgrass. When there is scarcity of food even humans turn to this weed for sustenance. 1 use of knotweed leaves corresponds to a bland and unappetizing 25% of a day’s meal.
  • Dye: The leaves of the knotweed plant can yield a dull blue dye; in addition, the stems can produce a yellow dye. A Craft (alchemy) DC15 check will produce a dye that ranges in color from blue to green to yellow, depending upon the proportion of stems and leaves used to create the dye.


Name: Kudzu
Found: Temperate forest, hills, and mountains
Description: Kudzu is a high climbing, coarse textured twining and trailing type of perennial vine with a huge root that grows to the size of an adult human body.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC10, 4d8 uses of root
Uses

  • Alchemist’s Kindness: Kudzu root can be mixed with other herbs to form a tincture that is used to treat excessive intoxication with alcohol; it is also used to treat the effects of hangovers, as well as long term alcoholism in people. A DC15 Craft (alchemy) check creates a dose of Alchemist’s Kindness. In addition to the stated effects, it will eliminate the effects of being drunk within 10 minutes of drinking it. However, additional alcoholic drinks taken within 24 hours may be violently purged (Fort DC20 or become nauseated for 3d6+2 rounds).


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Name: Lady’s Slipper
Alternate Names: Moccasin Flower
Found: Temperate forest and swamp
Description: Lady’s slipper is a perennially growing herb that reaches a maximum height of one to two feet. The stems of this herb produce oval-shaped leaves that are about 8 inches in length. Each plant produces a single flower that varies from yellowish to purplish-brown in color and is borne at the top of an elongated stalk. One petal of the flower changes into a structure akin to a yellow sac, known as the ‘slipper’ or ‘moccasin’. This herb has a spicy and bittersweet flavor along with a disagreeable smell.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of roots
Notes: Some believe that dewdrops which gathered on the leaves of the lady’s slipper have some magical powers that can help in the production of a the philosopher’s stone – a mythical magical stone believed to be capable of turning base metals like lead to precious gold and possibly returning the dead to life.
Uses

  • Spell Component: The leaves of the lady’s slipper are often used in the casting of spells that change one thing into another. Fresh (less than 1d6 days old) leaves of lady’s slipper can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells of the Transmutation (polymorph) school. A Craft (alchemy) DC26 will preserve the agrimony for up to 2d4 months.


Name: Lavender
Alternate Names: Sweet Lavender, True Lavender
Found: Terrains where the plant or mineral is found
Description: The lavender is multibranched and possesses a woody stem averaging in height from six and twenty four inches – it is thus, a small shrub. Lavender bears opposite placed leaves, each leaf is very narrow, and can range anywhere from three fourths of an inch to two inches in length, the leaves are gray green in color, and they tend to be flattened or matted against the branch. The flowers are baby blue in coloration and are fairly small sized; they have a strong characteristic smell. Each flower branch ends in spikes borne at the end of lengthy floral stalks.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC13
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d3 uses of flowers
Uses

  • Perfume: An aromatic and refreshing oil can be extracted from the flowers of the lavender plant; it is often added to other floral scents to make perfumes. Making a simple perfume from lavender flowers requires a DC12 Craft (alchemy) check; a more subtle and exotic perfume (giving a +2 circumstance bonus to Diplomacy checks) can be made by adding a masterwork component (Craft (alchemy) DC20) at a cost of 50gp in other ingredients.
  • Cooking: The leaves and flowers of lavender are added to food as a flavor enhancer. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve dried lavender flowers and leaves indefinitely for cooking.
  • Pipe Weed: Dried and crushed lavender leaves are often mixed with other pipeweeds to mellow the flavor and smell. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve lavender leaves indefinitely for smoking.


Name: Lemon Balm
Alternate Names: Bee Balm, Blue Balm, Cure-all, Garden Balm, Honey Plant, Sweet Balm
Found: Tropical and temperate hills and plains
Description: The plant commonly known as the lemon balm is an upright plant; it has hairy and branching stems that can reach a yard in height when fully grown. The herb also bears many light green colored and toothed ovate leaves which grow out in opposite pairs at each joint along the entire stem. White or yellowish two-lipped flowers appear on the branches and form along in small loose bunches located on the axis of the leaves – these floral outgrowths emit a strong lemony scent and give the plant its common name.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d3 uses of leaves
Notes: Bee keepers used the crushed leaves of the plant as a rub on beehives so as to encourage the domesticated bees to return to their hives; the belief is that these bees will bring other bees along with them when they return.
Uses

  • Calming tonic: A tincture made from the lemon balm is used to lift up the spirits, calm the nerves, and perk up morale. A DC15 Craft (alchemy) check produces a tincture that, when drunk, will lessen a creature’s level of fear for 3d6 minutes — converting the panicked condition into frightened, the frightened condition into shaken, or removing the shaken condition entirely. A creature that is not fearful gains a +5 alchemical bonus to Will saves versus Fear effects for the duration of the tincture. The effects of multiple doses overlap instead of stacking.


Name: Lignum Vitae
Alternate Names: Wood of Life
Found: Tropical and temperate forest
Description: Lignum vitae is an evergreen tree that can often grow up to a height of 60 feet. This tree generally has a twirled stem with grooved greenish-brown bark and it bears opposite, oval-shaped, compound leaves. The leaves are split into two or three pairs of light green leaflets each measuring up to 4 to 6 inches in length. The flowers of lignum vitae are blue hued and have a resemblance to the shape of a star. The laxative heartwood of lignum vitae has a greenish-brown hue and exudes a brown color resin that has a pungent taste.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC17
Collection Check: Survival DC17, 1d6 uses of wood, 1d3-1 uses of resin
Uses

  • Woodcraft: The wood of lignum vitae is considered to be very solid and is full of such fats and resins that items manufactured from it are not only impermeable to water, but also self-lubricating. The wood of this tree is employed for making axles, chisel handles, mallets and other items that require absorbing immense stress. Any predominantly wooden item can be made with the wood of the lignum vitae; however, the Craft checks required to make the item are increased by two (DC+2). Any object that would benefit from lubrication (such as a wheel axle or a mechanical trap) is considered masterwork if made of (or appropriately incorporates) lignum vitae wood. One use of wood is required per pound of weight for the item. Items made of lignum vitae wood have a hardness of 7.
  • Lubrication: The resin of the lignum vitae can be used to produce a slippery oil. A DC25 Craft (alchemy) check produces an oil that provides a +10 alchemical bonus to Escape Artist checks and combat maneuver checks to escape from a grapple. It also provides a +5 alchemical bonus to saves and AC to avoid the initial effects of sticky substances (like birdlime or tanglefoot bags). If spread on a floor, steps, or other object treat it as if grease had been cast upon the area or item; this effect lasts for 1 hour. One use is required per 5’ square; one use will also cover a Medium (or smaller) object or creature. The effects of this oil do not stack with those of other oils (such as a salve of slipperiness,) or similar magical effects. Oil of lignum vitae will last 3d4 months before going rancid.
  • Blood Detector: The resin of the lignum vitae can be used to produce a dark brown fluid that turns bright blue when mixed when exposed to the blood of a humanoid or animal. This use of lignum vitae is generally only of concern to the Realm Guard, who use this to investigate murders and other violent crimes. A DC15 Craft (alchemy) can prepare this fluid; it lasts for 3d6 months before going bad.


Name: Lobelia
Alternate Names: Floatweed
Found: Temperate and cold plains
Description: The herb known as the lobelia can reach from one to two feet in height. The herb grows as an annual or as a biennial. It is characterized by being covered by hair, bearing distinct angled and branched stem with yellowish or light green colored leaves. When in season, the plant will bear pale violet blue colored spiky flowers and oval shaped fruit with small brown seeds within.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC13, 1d6 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Floatweed: Lobelia leaves are often dried and smoked; doing so brings a subtle high that drains tension and relaxes muscles. Users often describe a pleasurable feeling of weightlessness or floating. Using lobelia in this manner can be dangerous; not only is it addictive, but lobelia is downright poisonous. Overdose can induce paralysis that results in coma, or even death. When smoked lobelia provides a feeling of well-being and friendliness, providing 1d4+1 bonus to Charisma 6d6 + 39 minutes, along with a feeling of floating or drifting. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve lobelia leaves indefinitely for smoking. Side Effect: Poison effect (see below, -3 to save DC). Potential for Moderate addiction Fort DC20.
  • Poison: Lobelia acts as a muscle relaxant; weakening the subject’s muscles and impairing coordination. Because of its distinct taste and smell and slow acting time, it is not a commonly used poison. Craft (alchemy) DC16 to create Inhaled or Ingested Poison (Powder, Fort DC16); 1 hour onset, 1 save/hour for 6 hours; Cure: 2 save; Effect: 1d4 STR damage, once STR equals zero additional damage is CON damage. +5 to Perception checks to notice the poison when first encountered. Concentration the poisonous aspects of the lobelia is at the expense of the relaxing drug-like aspects above.


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Name: Maidenhair Fern
Alternate Names: Rock Fern
Found: Temperate swamps and streams (especially near waterfalls)
Description: The plant called the maidenhair fern is of great delicacy and beauty. The plant is characterized by the presence of a thin and polished, black colored main leaf stalk, this is in contrast to the fan like leaflets which are held up by stalks fine as human hair – the overall effect is very beautiful and nice. There is a great demand for the plant in the preparation of dried flower arrangements because of the leaves which resemble gossamer.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC18, 1d4 uses of leaves
Notes: The plant has water repelling compounds on the foliage with the result that water runs off the leaves, and even when the plant is immersed in water the leaves remain dry.
Uses

  • Spell Component: Due to its affinity with water, the leaves of the maidenhair fern can aid in the casting of spells related to water. Fresh (less than 1d2 days old) leaves from the plant can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Water descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC26 will preserve the leaves for up to 2d6 months.


Name: Male Fern
Alternate Names: Knotty Brake, Shield Fern, Sweet Brake
Found: Temperate hills and forest
Description: This useful herb grows up to two to four feet in height and bears insipid green leaves also known as fronds. These fronds are narrow and tasseled and grow closely packed all the way up to the fleshy stem. The tuberous root of the male fern is reddish brown in color and is usually small, bulky and scaled.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d3 uses of roots
Notes: The male fern is often associated with incantations and spells creating something out of nothing because the plants lacked seeds and seemed to magically appear.
Uses

  • Cure for Parasites: The male fern can be used to prepare a cure for parasitic infestations; in particular, the male fern is among the best remedies for tapeworm ever. A DC15 Craft (alchemy) check will prepare a herbal infusion that, when drunk, provides a +5 alchemical bonus to Fortitude saves vs parasite-based diseases. If the disease is predominantly one of the gut and intestine, this bonus rises to +10, and against tapeworms the bonus rises to +20. Once prepared, the infusion lasts 4d8 days.
  • Spell Component: The fronds of the male fern can aid in the casting of spells that create something from nothing. Fresh (less than 4d8 hours old) male fern fronds can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells from the school of Conjuration (creation). A Craft (alchemy) DC28 will preserve these fronds for up to 2d4 months.


Name: Mayapple
Alternate Names: Ducks Foot, Hog Apple, Mandrake, Raccoon Berry
Found: Temperate and cold forest
Description: Mayapple is a perennial herb that is normally between one to two feet in height. The plant bears leaves of which one or two open out like an umbrella and has only one white flower that blossoms below the leaves. The plant has a clambering root that is reddish brown in color; it is often as thin as a pencil and grows up to six feet. The mayapple plant bears fruits that are small and yellow in color; these fruits are syrupy and slightly sweet, and are reputed to be a favorite of small boys, pigs, and raccoons.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 1d3 uses of fruit, 1d4 uses of root
Notes: Because the fruit is rather unreliable, many people refuse to eat it, and consider the plant cursed.
Uses

  • Food: The mayapple fruit is not generally poisonous; however, sometimes the toxins from the rest of the plant can seep into the flesh of the fruit. 1 use of mayapple fruit corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Eating the fresh mayapple fruit exposes the character to the poison (see below); however, reduce the Fort DC by 4d6. If the DC falls below 0 the fruit is nontoxic. Mayapple fruit can be preserved for 1d4 years with a DC10 Craft (alchemy) check; during this process the poison can be removed, reducing the fruit’s save DC by 1 for each point by which an additional Craft (alchemy) check exceeds DC14.
  • Poison: Mayapple root can be concentrated into a powerful poison, causing internal pain and gastric distress. Usually dried and powdered. Craft (alchemy) DC20 to create Ingested Poison (Powder, Fort DC20); 10min onset, 1 save/min for 6 minutes; Cure: 2 saves; Effect: 1d4 Dex damage, 1d2 Con damage (Fresh root reduces save DC by 1; fresh stems or leaves reduces it by 2)
  • Spell Component: Mayapple fruit can aid in the casting of spells inflicting lasting harm or detriment upon others. Fresh (less than 2d4 days old) mayapple fruit can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Curse descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 will preserve the fruit for up to 2d4 months.


Name: Marshmallow
Alternate Names: Sweetweed
Found: Temperate swamps
Description: The root of the plant is white in color and tastes sweet similar to the parsnip. However, unlike the parsnip, marshmallow roots contain plenty of mucilage, a gummy substance secreted by some plants. The plant has numerous branchless stems that are wooly or covered with long, soft, white hairs. These stems bear serrated leaves that are also covered with fine hair. The flowers of the herb are approximately two inches in width and they may be found in white, light red or royal purple colors.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 2d3 uses of root
Uses

  • Cooking: Marshmallow root is often added to substances to sweeten them; care must be taken, however, or the mucilage will change the texture of the dish. A Craft (alchemy) DC10 check will preserve marshmallow root indefinitely for cooking.
  • Candy: Marshmallow root can be combined with other herbs and flavors to create candies and sweets. An assortment of marshmallow candies and sweets can be created with a DC16 Craft (alchemy) check.
  • Base for Ointments: The mucilage of marshmallow root can serve as an excellent base for creams and ointments. _Marshmallow can be prepared as an ingredient with a DC20 Craft (alchemy) check; having such a base available grants a +5 alchemical bonus to the creation of any other alchemical ointment or cream. This base can serve instead to convert an existing recipe for an ingested alchemical item into a contact item; in this case the marshmallow base does not grant the +5 bonus to the Craft check to create the item.


Name: Mistletoe
Found: Temperate forest
Description: Mistletoe can be most easily identified by the appearance of its signature round, white, sticky berries. When in bloom, mistletoe forms small yellow flowers that appear in clumps of three. The leaves of the mistletoe plant are thick, tongue-shaped and yellow-green in color. They appear in pairs and grow to be about 3 inches long. The stalk of the plant, which embeds itself in the host tree, becomes thick and woody once the mistletoe is mature. As a parasite, mistletoe does not have roots; instead it draws all nutrients from the host tree.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC18
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d4 uses of leaves
Uses

  • Religous Use: Mistletoe is often used as part of the holy symbols of those who revere nature instead of (or in addition to) the gods. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve mistletoe leaves as a spell focus indefinitely.
  • Poison: The toxins found in mistletoe leaves attack the heart and brain, causing fever, seizures, delirium, and possibly hallucinations. Usually dried and powdered. Craft (alchemy) DC16 to create Ingested Poison (Powder, Fort DC16); 10min onset, 1 save/min for 6 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Effect: 1d3 Con damage, 1d4 Wis damage


Name: Mountain Ash
Alternate Names: Quickbeam, Rowan Tree
Found: Terrains where the plant or mineral is found
Description: Mountain ash trees are usually undersized, but some of them may be found growing up to a height of 60 feet. Each branch carries alternating leaves comprising anything between 11 to 17 leaflets that are oblong shaped. These leaflets are soft and have bristles on the downside. The mountain ash trees bear flat-topped clusters of creamy white hued blossoms during May. The fruits of the trees resemble round berries and have a vivid orange or radiant red hue. Each berry is about a quarter inch in diameter; collectively the berries are produced in huge clusters.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC10, 2d6 uses of berries (with an equal number of seeds)
Uses

  • Food: The fruits or berries of the mountain ash may be consumed raw or cooked. In fact, these berries are very acidic and consuming large amounts of the raw mountain ash fruits may result in stomach disorders. While the berries may be dried, pounded, and used as flour blended with cereals, despite their acidic properties, some people prepare jams, jellies and other preserves with them. 1 use of mountain ash berries corresponds to 25% of a day’s meal. Berries of the mountain ash can be preserved for up to a year with a DC10 Craft (alchemy) check; eating more than one use of them in a 24 hour period requires, after 30 minutes, a Fort save vs DC10+2 per use consumed (including the first two); failure means the character becomes nauseated for 1d4 rounds, then sickened. Any further food consumption will result in automatic nausea for 1d4 rounds. This abates after he or she has had 8 hours of rest with nothing to eat.
  • Spell Component: On the other hand, the seeds contain a toxic substance which produces an extremely poisonous acid when it comes in contact with water. Because of this, mountain ash seeds can be used to aid in the casting of spells involving acid. Fresh (less than 3d4 days old) mountain ash seeds can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Acid descriptor. A Craft (alchemy) DC25 will preserve the seeds for up to 6d4 months.


Name: Mouse-ear
Alternate Names: Hawkweed
Found: Temperate desert and (dry) plains
Description: Mouse-ear is a perennial plant that grows up to a height of anything between three and 15 inches. Mouse-ear is a creeping herb that usually grows like a carpet on crawling runners, every one of which takes the form of a basal rosette of oval-shaped leaves. Mouse-ear bears green leaves having white bristles on the upper side and white or gray-green color relatively softer bristles on the under side. The herb bears vivid yellow to orange-yellow flower heads that look like dandelions, but when one looks at them more closely, they discover that the flower head of this herb comprises florets. The flower head of mouse-ear encloses a milky juice or sap. These flower heads appear solitarily on stalks without leaves. The entire plant, barring the flowering parts, is swathed with glandular bristles, which are generally white, but occasionally reddish when growing on the stems. The rose-shaped arrangement of the leaves are complete, varying from sharp to blunt, and they vary in length between one quarter of an inch and two inches, while they may be anything between a quarter of an inch to an inch in width. Underneath, the rosette leaves are covered with bristles or hairs.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of leaves
Notes: The plant is sometimes called Hawkweed from the belief that hawks actually tear open the plant and soak their eyes with its sap so as to enhance their vision to enable them to swoop down on their victims with much more fatal preciseness.
Uses

  • Spell Component: Mouse-ear can aid in the casting of spells that allow one to observe from a distance. Fresh (less than 1d3 days old) mouse-ear leaves can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells from the school of Diviniation (scrying). A Craft (alchemy) DC24 will preserve the mouse-ear for up to 4d3 months.


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Name: Neem
Alternate Names: Margosa, Vepa
Found: Tropical swamps and marshes
Description: The neem is a fast growing tree, and it can quickly reach a height of 45-60 feet and at times can even grow up to a height of 100 – 120 feet. An evergreen, the neem is capable of surviving severe drought conditions, wherein it can shed some or all of its leaves and still flourish. Having widespread branches and a dense oval or round crown, the diameter of the tree may reach up to 60 feet. Its trunk is short and relatively thick (3 – 4 ft in diameter), and the bark may be fissured and roughly textured, reddish brown or whitish gray in color. The sapwood of neem tree may be grayish white. The heartwood is reddish when initially exposed to air, however after this it may turn reddish brown in color. The root system of the neem is comprised of a strong taproot and excellently developed lateral roots.

The leaves of the neem alternate along the branch. They can be about 8 to 16 inches long, with about 20 to 30 dark green to medium green leaflets about 1 to 3 inches in length. Very young leaves can appear purplish or reddish in color. The flowers are small, white, and fragrant, and grow in bunches of about 150 to 250 flowers. The fruit is olive-like and grows as either an elongated oval in shape or completely rounded. When completely ripe the fruit are about an inch or so in diameter. The skin is thin and delicate. The bitter-sweet pulp is yellowish-white and very fibrous. Inside is a single seed pod of dark brown; usually the pod contains one elongated kernel-like seed, but it can contain as many as three.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC16
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d3 uses of seeds
Uses

  • Skin Protection: The seeds of the Neem can be used to prepare an oil that is extremely potent in protecting against diseases and parasites of the skin. In addition, some stinging and biting insects find it repelling. A DC15 Craft(alchemy) check will prepare an oil that, when applied to the skin, provides a +10 alchemical bonus to Fortitude saves vs. diseases and afflictions that predominantly affect the skin. In addition, the oil has a 50% chance of repelling normal insects. In a sealed container the oil will remain potent indefinitely; once applied the oil lasts for 12+2d6 hours.


Name: Nep Nep
Alternate Names: Catmint, Cat’s Play
Found: Cold mountains
Description: Nep nep is a perennial herb of the mint family. Its erect, square, branching stem is hairy and grows from 3-5 feet high. The oblong pointed leaves have scalloped edges and gray or whitish hairs on the lower side. The flowers are white with purple spots and grow in spikes through the summer and early fall. When broken or bruised nep nep leaves and stems exude a mildly sweet smell that is slightly reminiscent of peppermint.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC12
Collection Check: Survival DC15, 2d3 uses of leaves
Notes: Felines are especially affected by the smell and flavor of nep nep, and will sometimes pursue it to the exclusion of all else.
Uses

  • Drink: Nep nep leaves can be brewed into a mild but refreshing tea. Note that the smell of the tea may bring the attention of any nearby felines. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve the leaves for tea indefinitely; actually brewing the tea, however, can be done by anyone. When brewed the tea acts as Cat Lure (see below); however, the range of detection is that of normal scent- and the Will save DC is 10.
  • Cat Lure: Hunters and rangers have learned to create an oil from the leaves of nep nep that proves almost irresistible to most felines. Whether domestic or wild, felines of all sizes and breeds tend to be attracted by the smell of this oil. _This oil is created with a Craft(alchemy) DC20 check. When applied, any feline with the scent- ability will be able to detect the marked object, creature, or location at double the normal range, note the direction with a free action, pinpoint it when within 10 feet, and track it by scent with a +2 alchemical bonus to its Survival checks. In addition, the cat must succeed at a Will save (DC12) or investigate the source of the smell. Handle Animal checks to command a feline that can smell nep nep oil suffer a -5 alchemical penalty unless the command involves investigating or moving towards the source (in which case the skill check receives a +5 alchemical bonus). Once the source of the smell has been discovered the feline will attempt to interact or “play” with it until the oil has worn off. Note that what a cat considers “play” may differ depending on size, type, and temperament.

The oil can be washed off by 2d4 rounds of immersion in water; otherwise it wears off in 2d6x10 minutes. Multiple doses (to a maximum of four total) of oil increase the detection range multiple by one (so two doses is detectible at triple the normal range, three doses at quadruple, etc), increases the bonus to tracking by 2, increases the Will save DC by ====2, and adds 1d6x10 minutes to the duration._


Name: Nightshade
Alternate Names: Bittersweet, Felonwart, Woody Nightshade
Found: Tropical and temperate plains
Description: Nightshade is a vine-like perennial herb that has long trailing or climbing stems that reach up to ten feet in length each. Characterized by possessing heart shaped to oval leaves that alternate on each side of the stem, each single leaf of the Nightshade normally has two ear-like segments at the base. The herb bears unique star shaped flowers which bloom in April lasting till September, these flowers are a pinkish purple and have bright yellow stamens. In the fall, the flowers turn into green berries that then turn a bright red in color. The berries initially have a bitter taste and then become unpleasantly sweet as they ripen.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC15
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of leaves, 1d4 uses of root
Notes: Inexperienced herbalists sometimes mistake these plants for belladonna and vice versa, especially since they are effectively prepared the same way.
Uses

  • Dulcamara: The leaves and roots of nightshade can be purified into a powdery drug called Dulcamara. When consumed this drug produces a mild euphoric high that relieves pain and induces sleepiness. A DC16 Craft(alchemy) check will prepare a special powder. For one hour anyone who ingests the drug will gain 1d4 temporary hit points and a +2 alchemical bonus to Fortitude saves. The person will also become fatigued. This fatigue cannot be removed until the effects of the Dulcamara have worn off. Side Effect: 1 point of Con damage and 1d4 points of Wis damage per dose. Potential for Minor addiction Fort DC16.
  • Poison: If taken in large doses nightshade can bring on more negative effects, such as great thirst, incontinence, diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness. In particular, taking a new dose of Dulcamara before 24 hours has passed from the previous dose can bring on these symptoms. The second and subsequent doses of Dulcamara taken within 24 hours instead act as an Ingested poison (Powder, Fort DC10); 10 min onset, 1 save/min for 3 minutes; Cure: 1 save; Effect: 1d3 points of Con damage and sickened. This effect occurs within 24 hours of the last dose consumed, regardless of effect. Note that Dulcamara’s bonus to Fortitude saves does not aid a character in resisting the effects of nightshade poisoning. A DC25 Craft(Alchemy check) can refine this poison as well. Each dose of poison requires a minimum of two uses of leaves and/or roots; each additional use (per dose) adds +1 to the DC of the Fortitude save.


Name: Niravai
Alternate Names: Negotiator’s Friend, Witch Teat
Found: Temperate and cold wetlands and coasts
Description: Niravai is a hardy, spreading, herbaceous perennial that grows to about 20 inches tall. Winter-hardy, it has slim, dark green, hollow leaves that rise from thick tufts. These leaves have a mild and delicate flavor and fragrance that is reminiscent of onion but with a sweetish undertone. Slender, white-sheathed bulbs develop in dense masses at the base of the plant; the bulbs, and thus the plant, are sometimes referred to as witch teat due to the shape of these bulbs. Although tasteless, eating the bulbs often calms the nerves and produces a cool sensation along the skin. A network of small thin roots often emerge from the base of the bulbs. These roots are how the plant spreads. Niravai produce small, round clusters of rose-purple or mauve star-shaped flower clusters at the end of a leafless stalk in mid-spring.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC13
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 1d6 uses of leaves, 1d3 uses of bulbs
Notes: Because the bulbs of the plant tend to cool the skin and calm the nerves when eaten, niravai is often served before any meeting in which tense negotiations are expected.
Uses

  • Cooking: The leaves of the niravai plant are most often added to food during cooking as a flavor enhancer. A Craft (alchemy) DC12 check will preserve niravai indefinitely for cooking.
  • Spell Component: Ginger can be used in the casting of spells meant to cool anger and calm passions. Fresh (less than 1d4 days old) niravai bulbs can provide +10 alchemical bonus to Spellcraft checks to cast spells with the Emotion descriptor, as long as the spell is being used to calm or suppress the target’s emotions. A spellcaster attempting to use niravai to excite or inflame a target’s emotions automatically fails his Spellcraft check, and increases the chances of the magic going awry by 10%. A Craft (alchemy) DC20 will preserve niravai bulbs for this purpose for 2d4 months.


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Name: Ordeal Bean
Found: Tropical forest, swamps, marshes, rivers and coasts
Description: The plant known as the ordeal bean is a woody climbing perennial; it consists of a twining vine that can reach lengths of fifty feet or more in some plants. This vine tends to root itself along river banks and coasts; from this rooting spot, the plant reaches out its climbing stems and climbs fifty to sixty feet high into tallest nearby trees. The ordeal bean bears large leaves in clusters of three. When in bloom the ordeal bean vine bears long clusters of big purple flowers. These flowers fall away in time and the ovules develop into six inches long, brownish yellow colored seedpods. These ripen on the vine and split, revealing two or three brownish-black seeds. Each seed is kidney shaped and approximately an inch in length.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC18
Collection Check: Survival DC14, 1d4 uses of seeds
Notes: In ages past this plant has been used as a type of botanical judge, jury, and possibly executioner in shamanic trials. For example, when a person was accused of a crime he or she would be forced to ingest several of the seeds. The accused would then be observed and proclaimed innocent if he or she regurgitated the beans and managed to survive the ordeal. Death implied guilt.
Uses

  • Poison: Ordeal bean causes the contraction and tightening of a creature’s muscles when applied; regurgitation is the only known method of purging the toxin in order to avoid death. Because of this it is an extremely effective although extremely obvious poison. _Ordeal beans, regardless of age, act as an Ingested Poison(bean, Fort DC14); 10min onset, 1 save per minute; Cure: Fort save DC reduced to zero; Effect: 1d6 points of Dex damage and 1d4 points of Con damage. A successful Fortitude save results in the creature vomiting up some of the poison, becoming nauseated in the process; however, the Fort save DC for subsequent saves is reduced by the amount by which the character succeeded. (For example, success by 4 reduces the Fort DC of the poison by 4.) Once the Fort save DC is reduced to zero the poison is considered to be completely purged from the creature’s system. The creature will continue to be nauseated for another minute, however, then sickened and fatigued. The character remains sickened for 2d10 minutes, but the fatigue will last for a full hour.
  • Broth of Judgement: In the case of very serious crimes some tribes grind the ordeal bean and use it to brew a potent coffee-like drink. This drink was then delivered to the accused as a way of standing trial for the offense. A DC12 Craft(alchemy) successfully prepares the Broth of Judgement. Failure on this check indicates that the preparer was exposed to the Broth and suffers its effects. (This ruins the batch as well.) Broth of Judgement requires a DC18 Fort save; it is otherwise identical to the poison described above.


Name: Owler
Alternate Names: Bloodtree
Found: Tropical and temperate rivers and coasts
Description: The owler is a deciduous tree that can grow up to a height of 100 feet. The branches of the tree extend to a curved top, while the leaves are wide, large, alternate and serrated. The leaves of owler are about four inches long and have a profound lustrous green hue at the top, while they are light and sultry below. Owler trees bear both male and female flowers in unattached clusters resembling cones in the early spring. The male flowers are greenish-yellow, but the female blossoms have a reddish hue. The fruits of the tree also grow in smoothed cone-type structures; they are green during summer and turn brown and woody during the fall. The owler has a preference for heavy soil in moist conditions and is able to endure long periods of submergence of its roots. It can even thrive in conditions where the depth of water is a foot deep for long periods of time. The trees habitually produce adventitious roots from close to the bottom of the stem and these roots provide supplementary prop up where the soil is unsteady, especially when the trees grow in waterlogged locations. Young trees develop rapidly, and can grow three feet or more in a single year.
Identification Check: Knowledge (nature) DC14
Collection Check: Survival DC12, 2d3 uses of bark, 1d3 uses of wood; Survival DC20, 1d2 uses of branches
Notes: When cut the normally pale wood of the owler turns a deep red, leading some to call these Bloodtrees. Over time, however, this color fades to a paler, richer brown.
Uses

  • Magic Item Creation: It is widely believed that the owler’s ability to channel and control water makes it well suited to channeling and controlling magic as well; many spellcasters thus prefer owler branches for the creation of wands and staves. An owler branch can be prepared for enchantment as a magic wand or staff; in either case, a DC26 Craft(carpentry) check is necessary to carve the wood into the appropriate shape. In addition, a DC30 Craft(alchemy) check is necessary to prepare and harden the owler wood. If both of these checks succeed then any spell cast using charges from the wand or staff gains a +2 alchemical bonus to the save DC. If either check fails, however, the bonus is lost.
  • Dye: The bark of the owler can yield dyes of various colors, depending upon how it is prepared. A Craft (alchemy) DC15 check produces a dye that can be used to stain objects a variety of colors from red to yellow (and any combination thereof, including black, brown, and orange).
  • Boatmaking: Because owler wood becomes harder the longer it stays underwater it is highly prized by boat makers and shipwrights, as well as anyone who must build items that remain submerged for long periods of time. While submerged any object made of owler wood has its hardness doubled. In addition, it is immune to mundane and magical rot and decay while submerged. Note that owler wood enjoys neither of these benefits if above water, or submerged in other liquids.


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Plants and Minerals

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